Draft Glasgow Climate Summit outcome text

 

DRAFT TEXT

on 1/CMA.3

 

Version 10/11/2021 05:51

 

Draft CMA decision proposed by the President

 

The Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement,

Emphasizing the importance of multilateralism in tackling climate change and the crucial role of international cooperation in implementing the Paris Agreement to the highest possible ambition,

Acknowledging the devastating impacts of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and the importance of ensuring a sustainable, resilient and inclusive global recovery, showing solidarity particularly with developing country Parties,

Also acknowledging that climate change is a common concern of humankind, Parties should, when taking action to address climate change, respect, promote and consider their respective obligations on human rights, the right to health, the rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, migrants, children, persons with disabilities and people in vulnerable situations and the right to development, as well as gender equality, empowerment of women and intergenerational equity,

Noting the importance of ensuring the integrity of all ecosystems, including the ocean and the cryosphere, and the protection of biodiversity, recognized by some cultures as Mother Earth, and noting the importance for some of the concept of ‘climate justice’ when taking action to address climate change,

Guided by equity and common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances,

Expressing appreciation to the Heads of State and Government who participated in the World Leaders Summit in Glasgow and for the increased targets and actions announced and the commitments made to work together and with non-Party stakeholders to accelerate action in key sectors by 2030, noting that some Parties chose to endorse the Glasgow Leaders’ Declaration on Forests and Land Use1 and the Breakthrough Agenda,2

Recognizing the important role of civil society, including youth and indigenous peoples, in addressing and responding to climate change, and highlighting the urgent need for action,

 

I.        Science

1.              Recognizes the importance of the best available science for effective climate action and policymaking;

2.              Welcomes the contribution of Working Group I to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Sixth Assessment Report and looks forward to the related forthcoming Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports;

3.              Expresses alarm and concern that human activities have caused around 1.1 °C of warming to date, that impacts are already being felt in every region, and that the carbon budget consistent with achieving the Paris Agreement temperature goal is being rapidly depleted;

 

1 Available at https://ukcop26.org/glasgow-leaders-declaration-on-forests-and-land-use/.

2 Available at https://ukcop26.org/cop26-world-leaders-summit-statement-on-the-breakthrough- agenda/.


4.              Stresses the urgency of increased ambition and action in relation to mitigation, adaptation and finance in this critical decade to address the gaps in the implementation of the long-term goals of the Paris Agreement;

 

II.       Adaptation

5.              Notes with serious concern the finding from the contribution of Working Group I to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Sixth Assessment Report that every additional increment of global warming worsens climate and weather extremes and their impacts on people and nature;

6.              Recognizes that adaptation needs will continue to increase with the severity of impacts in line with rising temperatures;

7.              Emphasizes the urgency of scaling up action and support to enhance adaptive capacity and reduce vulnerability to climate change in line with science and the priorities and needs of developing country Parties;

8.              Welcomes the adaptation communications and national adaptation plans submitted to date, which enhance the implementation and understanding of adaptation actions;

9.              Requests Parties that have not yet done so to submit their adaptation communications pursuant to decision 9/CMA.1 ahead of the twenty-seventh session of the Conference of the Parties (November 2022) so as to provide timely input to the first global stocktake;

10.           Reaffirms that, pursuant to Article 7, paragraph 13, of the Paris Agreement, continuous and enhanced international support shall be provided to developing country Parties including for developing and implementing their national adaptation plans, adaptation communications and other actions;

11.           Invites the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to present to the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its fourth session (November 2022) the findings from the contribution of Working Group II to its Sixth Assessment Report relevant to assessing adaptation needs and calls upon the research community to further the understanding of global and local impacts of climate change, response options and adaptation needs;

12.           Welcomes the Adaptation Committee’s work on approaches to reviewing the overall progress made in achieving the global goal on adaptation reflected in its 2021 report,3 carried out in accordance with decision 1/CMA.2, paragraph 14;

13.           [Placeholder for paragraphs on the global goal on adaptation on completion of CMA decision];

 

III.       Adaptation finance

14.           Notes with serious concern that the current provision of climate finance for adaptation is insufficient to respond to worsening climate change impacts in developing country Parties;

15.           Urges developed country Parties to urgently scale up their provision of climate finance for adaptation so as to respond to the needs of developing country Parties as part of a global effort;

16.           Recalls Article 9, paragraph 4, of the Paris Agreement and calls upon developed country Parties to at least double their collective provision of climate finance for adaptation to developing country Parties as a step towards achieving a balance between mitigation and adaptation in the provision of scaled-up financial resources;

17.           Calls upon the private sector, multilateral development banks and other financial institutions to enhance finance mobilization in order to deliver the scale of resources needed to achieve climate plans, particularly for adaptation, and encourages Parties to continue to

 

3 FCCC/SB/2021/6.


explore innovative approaches and instruments for mobilizing finance for adaptation from private sources;

18.           Welcomes recent commitments made by many developed country Parties to increase their provision of climate finance to support adaptation in developing country Parties in response to their growing needs;

19.           Recognizes the importance of the adequacy, predictability and sustainability of adaptation finance, including the value of the Adaptation Fund in delivering dedicated support for adaptation, and invites developed country Parties to consider multi-annual pledges;

20.           Welcomes the contributions [of USD 350 million] made to the Adaptation Fund, which significantly exceed its mobilization target and represent significant progress compared with previous efforts;

21.           Also welcomes the contributions [of USD 413 million] to the Least Developed Countries Fund, which significantly exceed its mobilization target and represent significant progress compared with previous efforts;

 

IV.        Mitigation

22.           Reaffirms the Paris Agreement temperature goal of holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels;

23.           Recognizes that the impacts of climate change will be much lower at the temperature increase of 1.5 °C compared to 2 °C and resolves to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C, recognizing that this requires meaningful and effective action by all Parties in this critical decade on the basis of the best available scientific knowledge, reflecting common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities in the light of different national circumstances;

24.           Also recognizes that limiting global warming to 1.5 °C by 2100 requires rapid, deep and sustained reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, including reducing global carbon dioxide emissions by 45 per cent by 2030 relative to the 2010 level and to net zero around mid-century;

25.           Welcomes efforts by Parties to communicate new or updated nationally determined contributions and long-term low-emission development strategies that demonstrate progress towards achievement of the Paris Agreement temperature goal, and further welcomes commitments to reduce emissions in high-emitting sectors and achieve net zero emissions by or around mid-century;

26.           Notes with serious concern the synthesis report on nationally determined contributions under the Paris Agreement,4 according to which the aggregate greenhouse gas emission level, taking into account implementation of all submitted nationally determined contributions is estimated to be 13.7 per cent above the 2010 level in 2030;

27.           Emphasizes the urgent need for Parties to increase their efforts to collectively reduce emissions through accelerated action and implementation of domestic mitigation measures in accordance with Article 4, paragraph 2, of the Paris Agreement;

28.           Decides to establish a work programme to urgently scale-up mitigation ambition and implementation during the critical decade of the 2020s;

29.           Urges Parties that have not yet submitted new or updated nationally determined contributions in accordance with decision 1/CP.21, paragraphs 23-24 to do so as soon as possible in advance of the twenty-seventh session of the Conference of the Parties (November 2022);

 

 

 

4 FCCC/PA/CMA/2021/8/Rev.1.


30.           Recalls Article 4, paragraphs 3 and 11, of the Paris Agreement, and urges Parties to revisit and strengthen the 2030 targets in their nationally determined contributions, as necessary to align with the Paris Agreement temperature goal by the end of 2022;

31.           Requests the secretariat to produce an updated version of the synthesis report on nationally determined contributions under the Paris Agreement annually;

32.           Decides to convene an annual high-level ministerial round table on pre-2030 ambition, beginning at CMA 4 (November 2022);

33.           Urges Parties that have not yet done so to communicate, by CMA 4 (November 2022), long-term low greenhouse gas emission development strategies in accordance with Article 4, paragraph 19, of the Paris Agreement that set out pathways with plans and policies towards just transitions to net zero emissions by or around mid-century in line with the Paris Agreement temperature goal;

34.           Notes the importance of aligning nationally determined contributions with long-term low greenhouse gas emission development strategies;

35.           Invites Parties to regularly update these strategies in line with the best available science;

36.           Requests the secretariat to prepare a synthesis report on long-term low greenhouse gas emission development strategies under the Paris Agreement for consideration by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its fourth session (November 2022);

37.           Calls upon Parties to accelerate the phasing-out of coal and subsidies for fossil fuels;

38.           Invites Parties to consider further opportunities to reduce non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gas emissions;

39.           Emphasizes the critical importance of nature-based solutions and ecosystem-based approaches, including protecting and restoring forests, to reducing emissions, enhancing removals and protecting biodiversity;

40.           Invites the Secretary-General of the United Nations to convene world leaders in 2023 to consider ambition to 2030;

41.           Recognizes that enhanced support for developing country Parties will allow for higher ambition in their actions;

 

V.        Finance, technology transfer and capacity-building for mitigation and adaptation

42.           Urges developed country Parties to provide financial resources to assist developing country Parties with respect to both mitigation and adaptation, in continuation of their existing obligations under the Convention, and encourages other Parties to provide or continue to provide such support voluntarily;

43.           Acknowledges the growing need of developing country Parties, in particular due to the increasing impacts of climate change and increased indebtedness as a consequence of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, and calls for greater support to be channelled through grants and other highly concessional forms of finance;

44.           Emphasizes the need to mobilize climate finance from all sources to reach the level needed to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement, including significantly enhanced support for developing country Parties, beyond USD 100 billion per year;

45.           Welcomes recent commitments made by many developed country Parties to increase their provision of climate finance in 2021–2025 and looks forward to these Parties providing greater clarity on these commitments through their next biennial communications under Article 9, paragraph 5, of the Paris Agreement;

46.           Urges the operating entities of the financial mechanism, multilateral development banks and other financial institutions to further scale-up investments in climate action and


calls for continued increase in the scale and effectiveness of climate finance from all sources globally;

47.           Welcomes the first report on the determination of needs of developing country Parties related to implementing the Convention and the Paris Agreement and the fourth biennial assessment and overview of climate finance flows by the Standing Committee on Finance;

48.           Welcomes the initiation of deliberations on a new collective quantified goal on climate finance [Placeholder: dependent on outcomes of CMA 8(e) New Collective Quantified Goal];

49.           Underscores the importance of these deliberations being informed by further work to understand and accelerate the actions required to address the financing needs of developing country Parties and to make finance flows consistent with a pathway towards low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development, building on the work of the Standing Committee on Finance;

50.           Emphasizes the challenges faced by many developing country Parties in accessing finance and encourages further efforts to enhance access to finance, including by the operating entities of the Financial Mechanism;

51.           Notes the specific concerns raised with regard to eligibility and ability to access concessional forms of climate finance and re-emphasizes the importance of the provision of scaled-up financial resources, taking into account the needs of developing country Parties that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change;

52.           Encourages relevant multilateral institutions to consider how vulnerability to the adverse effects of climate change could be reflected in the provision and mobilization of concessional financial resources;

53.           Underscores the urgency of making finance flows consistent with a pathway towards low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development in a transparent and inclusive manner that leads to sustainable growth;

54.           Calls upon developed country Parties, multilateral development banks and other financial institutions to accelerate the alignment of their financing activities with the goals of the Paris Agreement, noting the need for commitments to be informed by the best available science and in line with efforts to ensure sustainable development and the eradication of poverty;

55.           Acknowledges the progress made on capacity-building, particularly in relation to enhancing the coherence and coordination of capacity-building activities towards the implementation of the Convention and the Paris Agreement;

56.           Recognizes the need to continue supporting developing country Parties in identifying and addressing both current and emerging capacity-building gaps and needs, and to catalyze climate action and solutions to respond;

57.           Also welcomes the outcomes of the “COP26 Catalyst for Climate Action Assembly” and the strong commitments made by many Parties to take action forward;

58.           Further welcomes the joint annual reports of the Technology Executive Committee and the Climate Technology Centre and Network for 2020 and 2021 and invites the two bodies to strengthen their collaboration;

59.           Emphasizes the importance of technology development and transfer for the implementation of mitigation and adaptation action, and the importance of predictable, sustainable and adequate funding for the Technology Mechanism;

 

VI.        Loss and damage

60.           Acknowledges that climate change has already and will increasingly cause loss and damage and, as temperatures rise, impacts from climate and weather extremes, as well as slow onset events, will pose an ever-greater social, economic and environmental threat;


61.           Reiterates the urgency of scaling up action and support, including finance, technology transfer and capacity-building, for implementing approaches for averting, minimizing and addressing loss and damage associated with the adverse effects of climate change in developing country Parties that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change;

62.           Urges developed country Parties, operating entities of the Financial Mechanism, United Nations and intergovernmental organizations and other bilateral and multilateral institutions, including non-governmental organizations and private sources, to provide enhanced and additional support for activities addressing loss and damage associated with climate change impacts;

63.           Recognizes the importance of technical assistance in building capacity to implement approaches to averting, minimizing and addressing loss and damage;

64.           Welcomes the further operationalization of the Santiago network for averting, minimizing and addressing loss and damage associated with the adverse effects of climate change, including the agreement on its functions and process for further developing its institutional arrangements;

65.           Acknowledges the important role of a broad range of stakeholders at the local, national and regional levels, including indigenous peoples, in averting, minimizing and addressing loss and damage.

66.           [Placeholder: Outcomes of Ministerial consultations]

 

VII.        Implementation

67.           Resolves to move swiftly with the full implementation and delivery of the Paris Agreement;

68.           Welcomes the start of the global stocktake and expresses its determination for the process to be comprehensive and inclusive, address necessary structural and systemic change, and increase ambition as part of a global effort based on equity and the best available science;

69.           Encourages the high-level champions to support the effective participation of non- Party stakeholders in the global stocktake;

70.           [Placeholder - welcome completion of the Paris Rulebook]

71.           Urges Parties to swiftly make the necessary preparations for ensuring timely reporting under the enhanced transparency framework in line with Article 13 of the Paris Agreement and the timelines set out in decision 1/CMA.1;

72.           [Placeholder on support for enhanced transparency framework reporting requirements]

73.           Recognizes the need to take into consideration the concerns of Parties with economies most affected by the impacts of response measures, particularly developing country Parties, in line with Article 4, paragraph 15, of the Paris Agreement;

74.           Also recognizes the need to ensure a just transition towards a low-carbon future and the creation of decent work and quality jobs, including through the alignment of financial flows with the Paris Agreement, deployment and transfer of technology, and provision of appropriate support to developing country Parties;

 

VIII.        Collaboration

75.           Recognizes the importance of international collaboration on innovative climate action, including technological advancement, across all actors of society, sectors and regions, in contributing to progress towards the objective of the Convention and the goals of the Paris Agreement;


76.           Also recognizes the important role of non-Party stakeholders, including civil society, indigenous peoples, youth and other stakeholders, in contributing to progress towards the objective of the Convention and the goals of the Paris Agreement;

77.           Encourages continued and strengthened collaboration between Parties and non-Party stakeholders;

78.           Invites Parties and stakeholders to ensure meaningful youth participation in decision- making processes;

79.           Welcomes the improvement of the Marrakech Partnership for Global Climate Action for enhancing ambition;

80.           Commends the high-level champions for their leadership and actions to date to facilitate the scaling up and introduction of new and strengthened voluntary efforts by non- Party stakeholders;

81.           Acknowledges the work of the secretariat engaging with non-Party stakeholders and improving the Non-State Actor Zone for Climate Action platform to also support accountability and track progress of voluntary initiatives;

82.           Emphasizes the important role indigenous peoples’ knowledge and experience can play in effective action on climate change and urges Parties to actively involve indigenous peoples in implementing climate action and to engage with the second three-year workplan of the Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples Platform for 2022–2024;

83.           Takes note of the estimated budgetary implications of the activities to be undertaken by the secretariat referred to in this decision;

84.           Requests that the actions of the secretariat called for in this decision be undertaken subject to the availability of financial resources.

 

 


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