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Showing posts from January, 2022

Guest blog: Inspired or Confused - Larry Fink's Annual Letter

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Guest blog:  by  Mark D  Wolf:  Mark is a sustainability consultant, sustainability career coach and executive coach who works with leaders to integrate sustainability into business strategy, operations, and culture. He is also the Founder & Co-Lead of the NYC Chapter of the International Society of Sustainability Professionals (ISSP), the largest global professional association for leaders across the sustainability sector.  He recently co-authored  Thriving in the New Business Environment, Why Supply Chain Matters  and has been published in the  Journal of Sustainable Banking and Finance . Last time I wrote about my 22 sustainability predictions for 2022. Today I will share my thinking about recent events that have me both inspired and confused on the response to ‘code red’ alarm sounded in the most recent IPCC report. I am thinking about COP26 Glasgow, Larry Fink’s annual letter  to CEOs and GreenBiz’s  State of Green Business 2022 .    Firs

Learn Stakeholder Engagement For Disaster Risk Reduction & Resilience

  Join us for this  Sustainability in Action  event to hear about the research and global policy frameworks supporting this work, particularly the Sustainable Development Goals. Emily Gvino, of the Re-Energize Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience Project, will explain the current multi-level governance approach with respect to addressing vulnerability and how to improve upon the stakeholder identification and engagement process. She will compare current governance approaches and vulnerability indicators within the United States, as they relate to those left out of the process by discrimination, geography, governance, socioeconomic status, shocks, and fragility, or similar issues. The frequency and severity of weather-related hazards are expected to worsen with the impacts of climate change. By 2030, there could be 325 million people globally bearing the burden of these events. The  Re-Energize Disaster Ris

Guest blog: High Level Climate Champions

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Guest blog by Nigel Topping High Level Champion for Climate Action at COP26. Originally published here. If there is one lesson we can take from 2021, it's that climate action is going to have to grow much faster to keep up with the climate change impacts we’re already seeing. Our two weeks at COP26 last year showed us the growing speed and determination with which businesses, investors, cities and regions are committing to halve emissions within this decade and reach net zero before 2050. At the same time, we need to adapt and build resilience to the unfolding impacts of climate change. 2021 saw catastrophic wildfires in California and Greece; floods in India, Australia, Turkey, China, Belgium, Germany and South Sudan; locust plagues in East Africa; deadly cold in Texas and melting of the permafrost that supports infrastructure and homes in Russia. There is no time to lose. If global warming reaches 1.5°C by 2030, nearly half the world’s population will be at risk from haz

Changing Our Policies, Changing Ourselves

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Guest blog by  Pragati Pascale. She is  a Strategic Communications Consultant and Writer who has worked for a number of  UN posts that include Chief, Development Section, Strategic Communications Division  United Nations and Spokesperson for Rio+20. For over thirty years, as I have worked for the UN on major sustainable development and climate summits, I have watched as most, like the Glasgow COP, result in government and business pledges that are a step in the right direction, but nowhere near what is needed. And probably like many of you, I have asked myself, what will it take for change to actually happen on the scale and timeline required? Is there any hope? As climate change and broken ecosystems are now causing massive suffering and devastation, and we collectively become more desperate for answers, it seems that more and more people are open to a deeper approach – that we need to change not only our policies, but also ourselves. We hear variations on this message from voic

2022 Global Risks Report by the World Economic Forum

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II The   Global Risks Report 2022 , we share the results of the latest Global Risks Perception Survey (GRPS) in the context of the current global outlook, followed by an analysis of growing divergences in the areas of climate transition, cybersecurity, mobility, and outer space. We examine the tensions arising from such divergence, spillover effects, consequences for stakeholders, and shocks that could arise. The report concludes with reflections on resilience, drawing from the lessons of year two of the pandemic. The key findings of the survey and the analysis are below. Global risks perceptions • COVID-19 Hindsight:  Respondents noted that societal and environmental risks have worsened the most since the start of the pandemic, with “social cohesion erosion” and “livelihood crises” taking the top spots. Other risks identified as having worsened significantly are “debt crises”, “cybersecurity failures”, “digital inequality” and “backlash against science”. • Outlook and Sentiment:  onl

Guest blog: 22 Sustainability Predictions for 2022

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Guest blog by Mark D Wolf:  Mark is a sustainability consultant, sustainability career coach and executive coach who works with leaders to integrate sustainability into business strategy, operations, and culture. He is also the Founder & Co-Lead of the NYC Chapter of the International Society of Sustainability Professionals (ISSP), the largest global professional association for leaders across the sustainability sector. He recently co-authored  Thriving in the New Business Environment, Why Supply Chain Matters  and has been published in the  Journal of Sustainable Banking and Finance .   1)   Sustainability reports will be exponentially more complicated to curate 2)   Sustainability careers will continue their growth trajectory 3)   ESG is becoming the new bitcoin for large, publicly traded companies – trust and verify 4)   Finance will be a more willing, collaborative partner in the sustainability journey 5)   Sustainability leaders will have more flexibility in their