Skip to main content

Nexus 2014: Water, Food, Climate and Energy Conference


Call for Abstracts

Nexus 2014: Water, Food, Climate and Energy Conference

March 4–7, 2014

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill, NC USA

 The Water Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host the Nexus 2014: Water, Food, Climate and Energy Conference on March 3-7, 2014.  The Conference will bring together researchers and practitioners working in government, civil society and business, focusing on the nexus approach. Building on the Water, Food and Energy Nexus Conference held in Bonn, Germany in 2011, this Conference aims to address the connected, but distinct, relationships between water, food, climate, energy, security, sustainability and development.
We are now accepting abstracts for poster and verbal presentations via the Conference website. The submission deadline is September 27, 2013.
During the next 17 years until 2030, we already know we will face:
  • Population growth: Expected to reach 8 billion by 2024 and 9 billion by 2050;
  • Economic prosperity: There will be a rising economic prosperity in some of the emerging economies particularly in India and China;
  • Increasing urban world: by 2030 over 60% of people will live in urban areas, which will increase to 70% by 2050.
These global impacts combined with climate change will mean:
  • Increased energy demand: global demand for energy by 30-40% by 2030;
  • Increased demand for food:  agriculture production to increase by 30-50% by 2030 to meet the global demand for food
  • Increased need for water: Demand for water will exceed global availability by 40% in 2030.
The themes for the 2014 Conference will be:
  • Economics and Finance of the Nexus
  • Politics, Policy and Regulation
  • Ecosystem Approaches and Resilience
  • Resource Scarcity and Security
  • Remote Sensing and GIS Approaches
Through the Conference, participants will be able to examine cutting-edge research, debate emerging solutions, and explore the link between science and policy. Additionally, they will have the opportunity to build new, or strengthen existing, networks as well as join the Nexus Academic-Practitioner Network.
The conference participants will aim to:
  • Learn from relevant case studies & examine cutting-edge research
  • Identify future research areas
  • Debate emerging solutions
  • Identify how science can inform policy processes
  • Build new, or strengthen, existing networks
  • Launch the Nexus Academic-Practitioner Network
  • Input to the UN Sustainable Development Goals process

The co-Directors of the Conference are Felix Dodds, fellow at the Global Research Institute at UNC and associate fellow at the Tellus Institute, and Jamie Bartram, director of The Water Institute at UNC, supported by an International Advisory Committee.

 More information about the Conference may be found at: http://nexusconference.web.unc.edu .

Comments

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Are developed countries trying to reduce political space to discuss sustainable development?

As I write this blog Committee 2 is discussing whether the annual resolution on Agenda 21, Johannesburg Plan of Action and Rio+20 should be scrapped.The resolution has been extremely important in the last few years for the discussion of subjects such as the High Level Political Forum and the Technology Facilitation Mechanism, the regional dimension of sustainable development and Sustainable Consumption and Production. Since last year, some developed countries started to challenge the very existence of the resolution. Their argument is that it is no longer needed because the 2030 Agenda should cover all aspects of the three previous conferences.

Although the 2030 Agenda does cover many of the aspects of Agenda 21, Johannesburg Plan of Action and Rio+20 it does not cover all and reduces the space YET AGAIN for debate and discussion on sustainable development. In response to the concerns expressed by developed countries, G77 proposed this year to shift the focus of the resolution to SCP.…

New Executive Director of UNEP announced

Erik Solheim according to Norwegian newspapers is to be announced today as the new Executive Director of UNEP. And later today Monday the 2nd of May ABC News confirm too.

He faced stiff competition for the number one job on the environment in the UN system. In the 6 Executive Directors of UNEP it will mean that developed countries will have had 5 of them with two Canadians (Strong and Dowdeswell) and Germany (Toepfer and Steiner). The only Executive Director to come from a developing country was Dr. Mostafa Kamal Tolba who died recently.

Erik brings considerable experience to the position having held been from 2007 to 2012  the combined portfolio of Norway’s Minister of the Environment and International Development; he also served as Minister of International Development from 2005 to 2007. During his time as minister Norwegian aid reached 1%, the highest in the world.

Since January 2013 he has been the Chair of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC). In the DAC he has emphasi…

Interview Felix Dodds on Five Years of Nexus

Interview Felix Dodds on Five Years of Nexus Felix Dodds is a Senior Fellow at the Global Research Institute and a Senior Affiliate at the Water Institute at the University of North Carolina and an Associate Fellow at the Tellus Institute. He was the co-director of the 2014 Nexus Conference on Water, Food, Energy and Climate and has become a leading voice for the Nexus. Felix makes the start for a new series of Nexus interviews.First published on the NEXUS PLATFORM NEXUS Platform: The Nexus approach was very much created at the Bonn 2011 Nexus Conference and sharpened in Chapel Hill 2014. After now five years of Nexus: did the initial idea ­­– increase the understanding of the interdependencies across water, energy, food and other policies such as climate and biodiversity – start to work out and why?Felix Dodds: There is no question in my mind that the Nexus approach was one of the important differences between the Millennium Development Goals and the Sustainable Development Goals. Al…